Foxes

The foxes in Guardian of Giria are red foxes (Vulpes vulpes).

  1. Adult males are called dogs, adult females are called vixens and juveniles are called cubs, pups or kits. A group of foxes is called a skulk.
  2. Red foxes live in family groups, with young from previous years often sharing the same territory if there is enough food to support them.
  3. Cubs are born in spring. There are typically 4-6 cubs in a litter. Cubs are born deaf, blind and toothless. Their mother remains with them for the first 2-3 weeks as they are unable to regulate their temperature. During this time, fathers and other vixens without cubs bring food to the den for the mother.
  4. Outside of the breeding season, red foxes don’t necessarily live in dens, although they may still use their den to escape very hot or very cold weather. They also use their dens to hide from predators. It is common for vixens to give birth in the same den each year. Some red foxes use their dens all year round. Red foxes sometimes share their dens with other animals, such as badgers.
  5. Red foxes have amazing hearing – their hearing is about 4 times better than that of humans. They can hear the squeaking of a mouse from about 100 yards.
  6. Red foxes are omnivores and have a very varied diet, eating mice, voles, moles, rabbits, hares, birds, reptiles and insects. Red foxes are opportunists and will take young ungulates, such as wild boar piglets, if the opportunity arises. Red foxes also eat lots of plants and fruit, especially in autumn when fruit is abundant.

For more information, see here.

Red Fox | www.guardianofgiria.com

Red Fox | www.guardianofgiria.com


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